This is not a goat

Have you ever bought a goat, chicken, or a medical kit from a charity’s gift catalog? I have… But I didn’t realize at the time the intricacies of goat purchasing. For many charities, the goat or chicken is simply a symbol of a donation amount, and in the fine print it reads that charity will use your dollars as they see fit. Other charities actually send out 300 goats one year, and 3000 the next, depending on what donors would like to spend their money on. In other words, goats are either inspirational pictures, or fluctuating, donor-driven programs.

At Vulnerable Children Society, we don’t have a gift catalog, and we don’t sell goats. Or chickens either.

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And this is why… Our programs are created by Ethiopian/Liberian organizations, to address the most pressing needs in those countries. The indigenous organizations, run by locals, create holistic programs to powerfully impact the lives of children and families. Our job as the fundraising partner is not to tell our African partners how many of anything they should have that year, or how to do their work. Our job is to connect you with them, so that children can be educated, families can be preserved, and communities can be transformed.

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We are transparent about our fundraising: you know that when you donate to VulnerAble Children Society, we send the funds to the program you have designated your dollars to help. And if that program is fully funded, or for some reason needs to be discontinued, we roll the dollars into our general program fund. Lastly, we publish our financial statements on our website, so that you can see, to the dollar, exactly how much money each program received.

For your holiday gifts this year, please consider donating to Vulnerable Children Society. We have three programs that need your help… Home tutoring and Ebola disease prevention in Liberia, afterschool tutoring at our Love and Hope Centre in Ethiopia, and retraining for teens who have worked in the sex trade in Ethiopia. Even stocking stuffer amounts are highly appreciated! and go along way to do good work in these countries.

Hope for Children in Ethiopia, Vulnerable Children Society

We won’t send you a picture of a goat, but if you donate and then send us an email, we will send you back a personalized card with a picture of the children you are actually helping, and information about the program. Your loved ones will love learning about the positive impact of your donation.

Many thanks! And warmest holiday wishes from all of us in Canada, Ethiopia, and Liberia.

Arnica Rowan, President
Vulnerable Children Society
http://www.VulnerableChildren.ca

Canadian Sunday School Supports Ethiopian Children’s Music and Dance Program

by Marie Matchett

Recently I was approached by my childhood church (St. Stephen’s United Church) and asked if I knew of a charity in Ethiopia that the Sunday School children could fundraise for.  Immediately Vulnerable Children Society came to mind.

After waiting over 4 years to adopt our son from Ethiopia through many ups and downs, a lot of the congregation were there to cheer with us and sigh with us when we hit yet another hurdle.  On our first trip to Ethiopia in October 2012 we were able to visit with one of Vulnerable Children Society’s former projects.  It was one of the highlights of our trip that we still talk about to this day!  We saw first hand the good work this wonderful organization was doing for the most vulnerable children.  So it was an easy choice when I was asked about a charity.  After bringing our son home and visiting Ethiopia twice, we knew how important it was to give back to a country that gave us so much, and the Sunday school agreed!

The Sunday school which consists of around 15 children fundraised throughout the year.  In September they kicked off the season with a pancake breakfast.  In December they had a service where all the loose offering was donated.  And in February they started Random Acts of Kindness and placed a jar though out the church for people to place loose change or money in.  This project alone raised $135!

In June I was asked to make a presentation to the congregation about our adoption journey and the work Vulnerable Children Society does.  I was also presented with a cheque for $450 which will go towards a music and dance program for the children at the Love and Hope Centre!!   It was an honour to accept that cheque on VCS’s behalf!

Vulnerable Children Society starts a Literacy Library

From Vulnerable Children’s President Arnica Rowan:

When I learned that I was going to Ethiopia in a couple of weeks, I asked Canadian Humanitarian’s Ethiopian coordinator, who operates the Love and Hope Centre, if there was anything I should bring. “10 books of the same title, for our reading club,” he replied. Vulnerable Children’s Love and Hope Centre provides after school tutoring, as well as hot meals, medical care and a safe place for 70 kids to play each day.

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Well, thanks to the generous contributions from a variety of donors, we are bringing a whole Literacy Library to Ethiopia next week! There are 10 books of every title, for the 10 students in each reading group. We were able to purchase readers and books at 1/2 price from Scholastic (thank you!) which made the donations go that much further. There are books at a variety of primary levels, all in English, with culturally appropriate topics. We have also purchase vinyl covers for all the books, and a library stamp, to keep them in good order and organized.

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If you are wondering why we would bring English books to Ethiopia, it’s because English is one of the keys to getting a good education. Primary schooling is taught in each region’s indigenous language, but by the time students reach post secondary, the majority of instruction is in English. The foreign language is also a big asset is several industries, including tourism and sciences. So enriching the students’ English second language studies is contributing positively.

Thanks so much to everyone who contributed to our project! We look forward to expanding the library as the students learning needs grow!

If you would like to make a contribution to this project, click the red box below.
Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org!

Request for Hygene Donations

With an emphasis on personal hygiene, the goal is for each of the 70 children at the Love and Hope Centre in Kality to have at least three sets of underwear: shorts, panties, socks and undershirts (100% cotton). The center also needs toothbrushes and toothpaste.

If you would like to donate these items to the Vulnerable Children Society’s Love and Hope Center in Kality, please send them to Communications Director Nicole, who will be travelling to Ethiopia in the near future. The address is below.

Or, if you are traveling to Ethiopia soon, please consider bringing these items to the centre. You can contact Nicole for details on how to get to the centre, and for their current needs: info@vulnerablechildren.ca

Nicole Bellefleur – Please send before February 1st
6 Gay Avenue
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
C1A-2N3
CANADA

Field Report: Humbled and Inspired

From Communication Director Nicole, December 2013, from the Love and Hope Centre in Addis Ababa:

The kids who are participating in this program are among the most at-risk in Kality, meaning they have lost one of both parents, are touched by HIV (either they and/or their parents are HIV+), and/or are very poor. They range in age from 5 to 13 years.

One might think that with so many challenges before them, they’d be down-in-the-dumps, but nothing could be farther from the truth. I was greeted with unbridled excitement and enthusiasm – these kids know how to make a gal feel welcome! They were eager to play games with me and show me around, and they just loved watching videos of themselves on my iPhone.

As someone who spent three years teaching English in Japan, I was impressed by how well the kids could speak English. They were all eager to introduce themselves to me, tell me their ages and shake my hand.

Before I left, they sang a joyful song. As I watched them, I couldn’t help but marvel at their resilience. These kids have experienced more hardship than most of us will ever know, but they aren’t dwelling on it. Instead, they are meeting life’s challenges head on, smiling all the way. It was both humbling, and inspiring.